[syndicated profile] fashionablygeek_feed

Posted by Nicole Wakelin

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WeLoveFine has debuted a whole new line of Spider-Gwen apparel. There’s a hoodie, hooded tank, sweater, and three different styles of leggings. You can preorder your favorites now with shipping expected on September 1st.

See more pictures after the break.

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SG_1_SpiderGwen-Tank-2-580x580

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Product Page (Prices Vary)

Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)

May. 25th, 2015 09:46 am
marina: (stand alone)
[personal profile] marina
Saw this movie late, after unfortunately consuming quite a lot of hype despite avoiding clicking on spoiler cuts, and now writing my review late, after most people have written theirs.

you will be shiny and chrome )

Finally, outside the cut, for anyone who enjoyed Furiosa in this film, allow me to strongly recommend Kameron Hurley's book God's War, the protagonist of which is extremely similar to Furiosa. My favorite non-spoilery quote about her is:

The world could burn around her, the cities turn to dust, the cries of a hundred thousand fill the air, and she would get up after the fire died and walk barefoot and burned over the charred soil in search of clean water, a weapon, a purpose. She would rebuild.
[syndicated profile] racialicious_feed

Posted by Racialicious Team

In honor of the U.S. celebrating Memorial Day today, we are reprinting this 2012 piece featuring veterans from many of our communities

We’ll begin with a video that was shown here in San Diego earlier this year, at a celebration of the Congressional Gold Medal awarded two years ago to the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and and U.S. Military Intelligence Service (MIS). The unit, composed mostly of Japanese-Americans, would see heavy action during World War II in Europe, and would go on to produce 21 Medal of Honor recipients. This unit’s exploits were chronicled in fictional form in the film Only The Brave, the trailer of which can be seen here.

[Note: One video under the cut auto-plays, but is SFW.]

Shifting focus to Vietnam, here’s the trailer for As Long as I Remember: American Veteranos, Laura Varela’s documentary about Latino Vietnam veterans. While it focuses on three South Texas residents in particular, the statistics cited here reflect the sobering cost of duty in the conflict for many servicemen, particularly when it comes to PTSD.

Last year saw the birth of AIVMI – the American Indian Veterans Memorial Initiative, a campaign led by the Seminole Indian Tribe of Florida to add a statue of a Native American soldier along the Vietnam Walkway near the Vietnam Wall on the National Mall in the nation’s capital. Here we have an interview regarding the issue conducted by Kimberlie Acosta at Native Country TV with Tina Osceola from the Seminole Tribe.

Finally, here’s the trailer for Veterans Of Color, a documentary focusing on black veterans from the Vietnam and Korea wars and World War II. The film, which is coming off a screening at the Sarasota Film Festival in Florida, is the result of a collaboration between the Association For the Study Of African American Life And History (ASALH) and the Veterans History Project.

The post Memorial Day: Remembering Soldiers of Color [The Throwback] appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

[syndicated profile] fashionablygeek_feed

Posted by Rielly

dream-catcher-bodice

This unique dreamcatcher bodice is definitely eye-catching and absolutely perfect for your next Ren Faire. According to Etsy shop owner Firelight Fashions:

“This dream catcher bodice is totally unique and truly amazing! With a large crocheted dream catcher on the back, this bodice is guaranteed to catch the eye of just about anyone! It has been a favorite of many people and has been seen on the runway at LA Fashion Week!

This bodice has adjustable laces on the on the front, and both sides. It comes to a beautiful point at the back and down the front. It’s also fully reversible!”

Check out more pics and color options after the break.

dream-catcher-bodice

dream-catcher-bodice

dream-catcher-bodice

Product Page ($129.97)

anybody at Wiscon?

May. 25th, 2015 07:09 am
crystalpyramid: crystal pyramid suspended in dimensional abnormality (Default)
[personal profile] crystalpyramid
We're doing a roundsing at Wiscon at 10, probably in the hallway outside the art show unless that ends up being too crowded/annoying.

i carry it in my heart

May. 22nd, 2015 01:06 pm
[syndicated profile] velveteen_rabbi_feed

Posted by rbarenblat@gmail.com (Velveteen Rabbi)

B9646da06dccdd354b36623ee8b98897You've probably heard the aphorism that being a parent is like having a piece of one's heart walking around outside of one's chest. Being a parent means being vulnerable to everything that can go wrong in the world. It means (or should mean) being intimately attuned to someone else's physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual wellbeing; feeling their sorrows and their joys.

This is not only true of being a parent. It is the complicated blessing of being a person who loves any other person deeply. When someone is beloved to me, and I to them, our hearts become permeable. I open myself to feeling some of what my beloveds feel. I yearn for my beloveds to be blessed with joy, and I accept that when they feel grief my own heart will ache along with theirs.

In this place and time the language of love and beloved is presumed to be romantic, having to do with two people "falling in love." But I think that if that's all the word "beloved" means to us, then we're shrinking the capacity of our language. A sibling can be beloved. A friend can be beloved. We don't just "fall" in love; if we're blessed to have relationships which deepen over time, we grow in love.

Every intimate relationship comes with the price tag of having a piece of one's heart walking around outside of one's chest, vulnerable to harm. If I give a piece of my heart to everyone who is beloved to me, then my heart is always expanding. A little piece of me travels with each of my beloveds wherever they go. An invisible thread connects my heart to theirs, always. They are never alone. Neither am I.

This is an incalculable gift. It is beyond words, and I don't say that lightly -- God knows I have plenty of words for most occasions! But emotional and spiritual intimacy beggars my language. We don't have good words for it, and the words we do have are too-easily written-off as overblown or corny. To love and to be loved -- to be beloved...! The connection is more than I know how to describe.

And sometimes the heartache is, too. I don't mean the heartache you hear about in pop songs, one lover leaving another behind. I mean the heartache of precisely the opposite: of being connected, heart to heart, feeling a loved one's happiness with them -- and also their sorrow or their grief. Have you ever felt so much love for someone that your heart threatens to burst out of your chest?

I've been thinking lately about what it means to seek to live with an open heart -- even when that also means that my heart is vulnerable to the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, not only my own but also the fortunes of those whom I love. How can I live that truth with integrity? How can I express my love in a way which will help to sustain my beloveds, and how can I receive their caring in return?

I'm using the term "beloved" to mean someone dear to my heart. But Beloved, with a capital B, is one of our tradition's ways of imagining God. God is the ultimate Beloved, and to God, we are all beloved. God has compassion for us, which is to say, God feels with us, because we are beloved of God. When we feel sorrow, God's heart breaks along with ours... and when we feel joy, we illuminate the heavens.

Our liturgy teaches that we are loved by an unending love -- a love transcending all space and time. A forever love. An infinite love. Sometimes I catch glimmers of how the love I feel for my beloveds is an infinitesimal fragment of that ahavat olam. Sometimes my love threatens to overflow my chest, and I think: I'm just one. If we could put together the love of all humanity, we could move mountains.

To borrow a term from Thich Nhat Hanh, when we love each other we inter-are. I become a part of you, and you become a part of me. This is one of the places where I experience God: in the connection between your heart and mine. God is in the space between us which is charged with concern and with caring and with love. And that's true whether we are physically side by side, or a thousand miles apart.

"When you love one another, then God is within you," as the Shaker hymn has it. Maybe that's why my heart feels too expansive for my chest. What human ribcage could contain that luminous Presence which is made manifest within us when we open our hearts in loving connection? As e. e. cummings wrotei carry your heart(i carry it in my heart) -- and in the link between our hearts, there is God.

i carry it in my heart

May. 22nd, 2015 01:06 pm
[syndicated profile] velveteenrabbi_feed

Posted by rbarenblat@gmail.com (Velveteen Rabbi)

B9646da06dccdd354b36623ee8b98897You've probably heard the aphorism that being a parent is like having a piece of one's heart walking around outside of one's chest. Being a parent means being vulnerable to everything that can go wrong in the world. It means (or should mean) being intimately attuned to someone else's physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual wellbeing; feeling their sorrows and their joys.

This is not only true of being a parent. It is the complicated blessing of being a person who loves any other person deeply. When someone is beloved to me, and I to them, our hearts become permeable. I open myself to feeling some of what my beloveds feel. I yearn for my beloveds to be blessed with joy, and I accept that when they feel grief my own heart will ache along with theirs.

In this place and time the language of love and beloved is presumed to be romantic, having to do with two people "falling in love." But I think that if that's all the word "beloved" means to us, then we're shrinking the capacity of our language. A sibling can be beloved. A friend can be beloved. We don't just "fall" in love; if we're blessed to have relationships which deepen over time, we grow in love.

Every intimate relationship comes with the price tag of having a piece of one's heart walking around outside of one's chest, vulnerable to harm. If I give a piece of my heart to everyone who is beloved to me, then my heart is always expanding. A little piece of me travels with each of my beloveds wherever they go. An invisible thread connects my heart to theirs, always. They are never alone. Neither am I.

This is an incalculable gift. It is beyond words, and I don't say that lightly -- God knows I have plenty of words for most occasions! But emotional and spiritual intimacy beggars my language. We don't have good words for it, and the words we do have are too-easily written-off as overblown or corny. To love and to be loved -- to be beloved...! The connection is more than I know how to describe.

And sometimes the heartache is, too. I don't mean the heartache you hear about in pop songs, one lover leaving another behind. I mean the heartache of precisely the opposite: of being connected, heart to heart, feeling a loved one's happiness with them -- and also their sorrow or their grief. Have you ever felt so much love for someone that your heart threatens to burst out of your chest?

I've been thinking lately about what it means to seek to live with an open heart -- even when that also means that my heart is vulnerable to the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, not only my own but also the fortunes of those whom I love. How can I live that truth with integrity? How can I express my love in a way which will help to sustain my beloveds, and how can I receive their caring in return?

I'm using the term "beloved" to mean someone dear to my heart. But Beloved, with a capital B, is one of our tradition's ways of imagining God. God is the ultimate Beloved, and to God, we are all beloved. God has compassion for us, which is to say, God feels with us, because we are beloved of God. When we feel sorrow, God's heart breaks along with ours... and when we feel joy, we illuminate the heavens.

Our liturgy teaches that we are loved by an unending love -- a love transcending all space and time. A forever love. An infinite love. Sometimes I catch glimmers of how the love I feel for my beloveds is an infinitesimal fragment of that ahavat olam. Sometimes my love threatens to overflow my chest, and I think: I'm just one. If we could put together the love of all humanity, we could move mountains.

To borrow a term from Thich Nhat Hanh, when we love each other we inter-are. I become a part of you, and you become a part of me. This is one of the places where I experience God: in the connection between your heart and mine. God is in the space between us which is charged with concern and with caring and with love. And that's true whether we are physically side by side, or a thousand miles apart.

"When you love one another, then God is within you," as the Shaker hymn has it. Maybe that's why my heart feels too expansive for my chest. What human ribcage could contain that luminous Presence which is made manifest within us when we open our hearts in loving connection? As e. e. cummings wrotei carry your heart(i carry it in my heart) -- and in the link between our hearts, there is God.

The Journey Home: The Isle of Rabbits

May. 25th, 2015 10:00 am
[syndicated profile] amiablebowfin_feed

Posted by amiablebowfin

The day after I arrived in New York was a Saturday, so the Jawas didn’t have work and we decided to go on an expedition to Coney Island. The point of going to a beach resort in the middle of winter is perhaps questionable, but it gave me a chance to collect more subway lines and to see Coney Island, which I was perhaps irrationally interested in doing. It was an amusing trip: I got to eat a “Coney Island hot dog” on Coney Island, though I slightly embarrassingly never actually had one in Detroit on my many trips visiting relatives there growing up.

The section of the subway we rode to Coney Island has express tracks but no express platforms.  The express tracks are no longer used, but were once the fastest express in the system as a result of the lack of stations. A view inside the Coney Island station, which Wikipedia questionably claims is the world's largest elevated railroad terminal. Another view. As you can see, I may have been kind of impressed by the station. I was also impressed by this store's openness about what it sold. The Jawas told me that this is the canonical hot dog stand on the planet.  So, we decided we'd better eat lunch there. They had a fairly wide variety of dishes, but this is the hot dog menu.  They sold what in Detroit is called a "Coney Island dog"; I hadn't been sure anyone actually ate those anywhere else. So, of course, I decided I'd better try one to find out what the real thing was supposed to taste like. Another view of the BMT Coney Island station. It really is pretty big for a subway station. Amusement parks, closed for the winter. Looking inland from the boardwalk. Apparently a minor league baseball team plays here in the summer. Looking inland from the pier. Further out on said pier. We returned to the station. And so an ad campaign involving lifeguard chairs.  A bit out of season. Me inside the station. The Second Avenue Subway has become enough of a joke to be mentioned in ads on the subway. Finally we returned to the Jawas' neighborhood.
Filed under: New York City, Trains I've Ridden
spiralsheep: A raven (spiralsheep Raven Logo)
[personal profile] spiralsheep
I completed a walk in anticipation of the [community profile] flaneurs June challenge (Lines II.c). This local council walk was the Lichfield Heritage Trail that I was given free at tourist information in the city. My route from the station to tourist information at St Mary’s (not at the Garrick Theatre as is claimed in the Heritage Trail leaflet) took me through Tudor Row.

01 Tudor Row, Lichfield 05-15

I also looked around the Lichfield Heritage Centre in St Mary’s while I was there. The stairs went up past an 1868 stained glass window depicting St Mary wearing too much concealer.

02 St Mary's, Lichfield, 1868 stained glass, 05-15

12 more small images. )

The Good Soldier

May. 25th, 2015 08:20 pm
tcpip: (Default)
[personal profile] tcpip
There is much I love about my workplace. High performance computing provides the computational infrastructure which allows scientists to make discoveries quicker and make life better for all of us. Just this week, I am thrilled to see my old work colleague Dr. Mike Kuiper once again finds himself making great discoveries that will save lives, ably assisted by HPC systems. It is very important to me that the workplace is a non-profit company (even if we have a separate commercial arm). I know that we don't have the same sort of resources as the commercial sector. That is why when travelling on the company's dime I fly the cheaper lines, stay at the cheaper accommodation, and typically eat in rather than dine out on a expense account. I like the fact that we're a registered research agency, and that the work being conducted here is (or should be) for the public good. That is part of the reason why I document much of the technical work of what I do (pretty pleased with my work on GAMESS in the past few days) - so other sysadmins around the world in similar institutions may get some understanding in the complex world of optimised compilations of scientific applications.

Which makes it all harder when the axe comes down and staff have to be "let go" to use the euphemism, which is what happened to several staff on Friday. It's almost Victorian in it's politeness isn't it? "We're giving you an opportunity for a new beginning". I imagine it doesn't feel that way to those on the chopping block. Certainly there were a couple whom I think weren't quite pulling their weight and there were others "let go" which quite surprised me. The reason for the axe falling was quite reminiscent of the last time; cash flow. In addition this time there was what I consider a serious structural issue which also contributed significantly to these matters. Senior management and the board carry responsibility for this - and they should know it; "the possession of great power necessarily implies great responsibility" - and that means responsibility in failure as well as success. I cannot help but think of Marx's comments on The Civil War in France when looking at the pay scales of the Commune - representatives should receive never more than the average worker. Management is a privilege as well as a responsibility.

The good soldier however continues their work from the trenches. Many of us have worked ourselves as if possessed by demons in the past year which has generated extraordinary uptime and usage for our clusters along and despite the devastating news we will continue to do so. However sometimes I wonder whether these efforts and the resulting research receives due consideration in a world where soporific entertainment is more worthy than great art and groundbreaking science, where political policy is determined by majoritarian opinions regadless of veracity, and where bureaucracy is more worthy than real work. Half a league, Half a league, Half a league onward ... Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why. To the good soldiers who have a fallen, I salute you: This is the saddest story I have ever heard.
[syndicated profile] angry_asian_man_feed

Posted by Phil Yu

San Francisco police seek suspect in fatal Chinatown attack on Lin Leung.



In San Francisco, a 77-year-old woman died Friday after suffering severe injuries from a randomly attack in broad daylight on Mother's Day. Police are still asking for the public's help searching for the suspect.

Woman, 77, dies after Mother's Day attack in S.F.

According to investigators, the attack happened between noon and 2:30 PM on May 10 after the victim, Lin Leung, got off a MUNI bus in Chinatown, possibly on Stockton Street.

Leung was apparently struck by a female assailant at least twice in the head. Investigators say that a Good Samaritan came to her aid, helping her move away from the side of the bus and sit on the curb until she was able to walk home. Three days after the assault, the woman's family found her unconscious at home.

Here's more information from the SFPD release:

Read more »

so wiscon was a thing

May. 25th, 2015 02:46 am
maevele: (Default)
[personal profile] maevele
still not sure what kind of thing because SO EXHAUSTED. I might have opinions on a lot of things, but my brain hasn’t processed much of it into words yet. I definitely had an awesome time and only got to talk to like 1/137th of the people I wanted to sit down and talk with, and even the ones I did get to talk to, it wasn’t ENOUGH.

Might post more about it after some reasonable amount of sleeping

Daily Happiness

May. 25th, 2015 12:20 am
torachan: black and grey kitten on the back of a chair (heidi on chair)
[personal profile] torachan
1. Not only is tomorrow my day off, but Memorial Day is one of the company's paid holidays, so I get paid to not go to work. Woohoo!

2. I had some nice cuddle time with Heidi in my sweater tonight while watching TV.

Read These Blogs

May. 24th, 2015 10:54 pm
[syndicated profile] angry_asian_man_feed

Posted by Phil Yu



10 Beautiful Portraits Of Asian-Pacific American Influencers: To celebrate Heritage Month, artist Jessica Singh drew these beautiful portraits of APA heroes for the digital campaign Sons & Brothers.

* * *

Stop using Asians as role models: Jeff Yang responds to Duke University professor Jerry Hough's recent controversial comments referencing an ugly old trope: Asian Americans as a "model minority" that Africans Americans should emulate.

* * *

Asian American Student Suicide Rate at MIT is Quadruple the National Average: MIT's Asian American suicide rate is quadruple the national average, and, according to recent studies, college-aged students are most at-risk for death by suicide within the Asian American community. How can we change these trends?

* * *

NYT Summer Reading List Finally Achieves 100 Percent Whiteness: "Congrats are in order! Janet Maslin's annual summer reading list for the New York Times has, at long last, achieved peak caucasity."

* * *

An open letter from the family of Lingzi Lu: With the conclusion of the trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, The Boston Globe published an open letter from the family of Lingzi Lu, the Boston University graduate student who was killed in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

* * *



Moving Photographs of Japanese American Internees, Then and Now: Photographer Paul Kitagaki Jr. has been tracking down Japanese American internees pictured in iconic wartime images by photographers like Dorothea Lange, and reshooting them, often in the locations where they were originally photographed.

* * *

Revisiting a World War II Internment Camp, as Others Try to Keep Its Story From Fading: The aging Japanese Americans survivors of wartime internment hope to keep the history of their detainment alive.

* * *

Japanese family to be kicked out of Altadena home: Despite a long-standing promise, one of the oldest families in Altadena, California is being forced out of a home they have lived in for close to 100 years.

* * *

Thank You, Cancer: Last Shalin Shah was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive cancer, and learned he only had a few months to live. After inspiring people around the world to find the beauty in every day, Shah died Saturday, May 16, 2015 at the age of 22.

* * *

These groups of Asian-Americans rarely attend college, but California is trying to change that: The California State University system has implemented the Asian American and Pacific Islander initiative, which runs college fairs for underrepresented groups in the API community.

* * *



Japanese American basketball leagues help girls progress at prep level: Southern California's popular Japanese American basketball leagues have been the starting point for many successful high school and now even college careers, particularly for young women.

* * *

Urban Ryu-newal: A New Era of Asian American Political Representation Begins in L.A.: Last week, David E. Ryu won the runoff election for Los Anglees' 4th District, becoming the first Korean American ever to be elected to City Council, and only the second Asian American to win a council seat in over twenty years.

* * *

40% of U.S. food goes to waste: One man's solution: An interview with Robert Lee, who co-founded Rescuing Leftover Cuisine, a nonprofit that collects leftover food from New York City restaurants and distributes it to people in need.

* * *

Southern Discomfort: Alexis Diao shares her journey from dreading school lunch to reconciling -- and savoring -- her Filipino and American Southern roots.

* * *

Photographer Kyoko Hamada Spent Two Years Pretending To Be An Elderly Woman, And Here's What She Learned: Photographer Kyoko Hamada went undercover to find out what life is like as an elderly woman.

* * *



The Definitive Guide To Being A Muslim In America: Aasif Mandvi, star of the sitcom parody webseries Halal in the Family, gives a few pointers on how to make it as a Muslim in America.

* * *

Mochi's 25 Game-Changers Under 25: Mochi Magazine's "Power Issue" includes a list of 25 influential Asian Americans in entrepreneurship and technology, sports, arts and entertainment -- all under the age of 25.

* * *

Can China Take a Joke?: After establishing a promising comedy career in the United States, comedian Joe Wong returned to China to be a part of the country's infant standup scene.

* * *

The Filharmonic take a cappella all the way to a guest spot in 'Pitch Perfect 2': If you watched Pitch Perfect 2 this week, you may have caught a glimpse of the Filharmonic, a Filipino American a capella group.

* * *

Q&A: Pig & the Lady gets in 'Big Trouble': An interview with the Le family, owners of Hawaii's Pig & the Lady. Fun fact: the restaurant's bathroom is a shrine to John Carpenter's cult classic Big Trouble in Little China.

Penny Dreadful 2.04.

May. 25th, 2015 08:45 am
selenak: (Malcolm Murray)
[personal profile] selenak
Wherein we find out that Ethan may know Latin but not Shakespeare and doesn't have a good mythology education, but is wise to deception nonetheless. Also John Logan manages to make table tennis oddly endearing.

Read more... )

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